Foley Food Mill is Your BFF for Making Jam

The beauty of using the FFM (Foley Food Mill) is that you get the pulp without having to peel your fruit before cooking it. While you can buy new Foley Food Mills, our experience had been that the older ones work better. We always keep an eye out for them.

Foley Food Mill on top of bowl with pureed peaches in bowl and peels in food mill.There are a few tried and true kitchen gadgets that earn their keep on your shelf.

 

The Foley Food Mill is definitely a must have for making jams, applesauce, and puréed foods.

We recently put ours to good use when we purchased a half bushel box of over ripe Freestone peaches. We gleaned the ones we could eat over the next few days and prepped the rest for cooking. Half bushel box of over ripe peaches.We washed, cut off bad spots, took out the pits and cut the peaches into chunks. We didn’t have to cut in small pieces with using the Foley Food Mill (FFM). We then cooked the peaches till tender. These peaches had a lot of liquid so we took out extra while cooking the peaches. We added it later to the pulp before making the peach jam.

To make the pulp you run the cooked peaches through the food mill by turning the handle. The handle cranks the blade which smushes the contents through the sieve holes. The pulp is what comes through the sieve holes leaving the fruit skin or peels in the food mill bowl. Occasionally you need to crank the handle backwards which scraps the peels off the sieve surface. You can remove the peels from the bowl before adding more cooked peaches to begin the process again. Continue until all your cooked fruit is turned into pulp. If you are running cooked apples through the mill, the peels and seeds get caught in the food mill bowl. Thus, you only clean, quarter and cook the apples. The Foley Food Mill is a fantastic time saver!

Large pan with steam rising from pan of cooking peaches. A large spoon is in the pan.The beauty of using the FFM is that you get the pulp without having to peel your fruit before cooking it. Once you have the pulp, you can go on to making your sauce or jam.

We made peach jam with our pulp. It turned out great and was almost a peach butter without all the extra work. Of course cinnamon was added to it! We used different sugars for each batch. We tried turbinado, coconut sugar, brown sugar, and white sugar. We liked the coconut sugar the best. It was a fuller, richer, molassessy taste. We also used the pulp to put in our protein shakes.Peach pulp after being run through Foley Food Mill in a large bowl with large spoon on top.

We use canning wax to seal the jam. Melt canning wax and pour at least 1/4 inch of wax on top of the still warm to hot jam filled jars. Let cool completely before placing lids on jars. As you know from reading my posts, Pete doesn’t always follow directions. The recipe that we used for this jam came with the package of fruit pectin. But, Pete used it more as a guide. Thus the wiggle room on the temp of the jam for wax sealing.Peach Jam in pint, half pint and quarter pint jars with white plastic lids.

For the backstory during our jam making, be sure to check out my blog about Managing when Your AC is Being Repaired. We bought the box of over rip peaches because it was such a deal compared to buying a small bag of peaches. However, upon returning home with the over ripes, we discovered the AC was broken. We persevered and got the peaches worked up over several days even without AC. We did the work in the evening knowing it would be cooling down a bit at night.

A couple of last thoughts for you about the Foley Food Mill. The bottom screw comes undone to separate the bowl from the crank/blade combo. This makes for easier cleaning. While you can buy new Foley Food Mills, our experience had been that the older ones work better. We always keep an eye out for them and keep a few on hand to give to folks we know. You can be on the look out for them at antique stores and garage sales and often get them for a couple of bucks. Happy hunting and jam making!Peaches cooking with a rolling boil on stove with stirring spoons in pan.

Author: Cindy Avery

Retired from education, Cindy still likes to learn and enjoys sharing useful and unique information. She hopes to encourage others in their learning journey.

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