Lake Superior’s Autumn Beauty is Breathtaking!

The rhythmic crashing of rolling and curling waves is mesmerizing to watch. Winds impacting Lake Superior create beautiful white caps and waves. Lake Superior’s Autumn Beauty is Breathtaking!

Lake Superior’s Autumn Beauty is Breathtaking!

 

Lake Superior’s Autumn beauty is breathtaking with its spectrum of moody changes between calm and violent.

Hollow Rock in Grand Portage, MN pictured above is a sight to enjoy no matter the mood of the lake. The whipping winds and waves are a joy to watch.

The rhythmic crashing of rolling and curling waves is mesmerizing to watch and offers a song unique to the day you are at the beach. Watching wave after rolling wave and seeing how far up the beach the water reaches offers endless entertainment.

Catching Autumn’s Fall colors along with Lake Superior’s beauty is a double treat.Rolling Lake Superior waves getting ready to hit the beach with Autumn trees in the far background.

 

 

 

Rolling Lake Superior waves getting ready to fall with Autumn trees in the far background.

 

Winds impacting Lake Superior create beautiful white caps and waves. You have to respect the power that wind and water generate!Rolling Lake Superior waves in foreground with white capped waves in background.

 

You have many lakes and streams feeding into Lake Superior that can also be appreciated. The Flute Reed River was especially pretty with its flowing brown water and complimentary Autumn foliage lining the riverbanks.

Flute Reed River flowing into Lake Superior with Autumn foliage on both sides of riverbank. Lake Superior waves are in the background.

Notice the Lake Superior white capped waves rolling inland as the river runs outward.

Enjoying Lake Superior and the North Shore of Minnesota is very easy no matter the season. Autumn offers its unique colors, winds, and occasional snow flurry. Note the northern Minnesota beach attire I’m sporting in the picture below. Also, don’t forget your tools for agate hunting as you are enjoying the sights and sounds of a LakeSuperior beach.Author dressed in jeans, camo jacket, orange cap, layers of clothing, and work gloves, carrying a bucket in one hand and a long handled agate tool in the other hand. She is on a Lake Superior cobblestone beach.

What is your favorite season and way to enjoy Lake Superior?

Black and white picture of Autumn foliage in foreground and rolling Lake Superior waves in background with the beach in between.

 

 

 

 

 

Nature’s Northern Fall Frolic

Take a few moments to enjoy Autumn’s Fall Frolic in the woods before Winter wraps the forest in a white blanket. It is fun to find some spots of color against the greenery of the forest and fallen leaves.

Looking upstream of the Flute Reed River with water rushing and Fall colors on the trees on each side of the river.Nature’s Northern Fall Frolic

Nature’s Northern Fall Frolic is providing us a new palette of colors with the changing of the season.

Summer is long gone as evidenced by the fading vibrant summer colors giving way to Autumn’s own rich hues. It is fun to find some spots of color against the greenery of the forest and fallen leaves.Fading purple flowers with evergreens, brush, and fallen leaves in background.

Winter can’t resist teasing with a few snow flurries so be sure to enjoy the Fall colors.Close up view of snow dusted flowers in Autumn forest.

 

 

 

 

Side angled upward view of snow dusted flowers in Autumn forest.Appreciating each season means looking for the various shades of color. The yellows, oranges, greens, and browns of Fall each offer a continuum of color for us to enjoy.

Deer print in rocky mud with a pen beside it for scale.

Appreciating Autumn in the woods might have you looking for animal tracks in addition to other interesting growths around fallen or decaying trees.

Fallen log in Autumn woods with interesting lichen and moss growing on top.

 

Tree stump in Autumn forest with snow covered fungi at the trunk base and dying grass in the foreground.

 

 

 

 

 

Upright dead tree in background with evergreen and other forest trees and white topped plants in foreground.Long dead trees still standing in the forest are interesting to see and they still serve a purpose. Sometimes you can catch a woodpecker or birds enjoying the remaining branches. These silent sentinels of the forest offer a unique beauty in their neutral colors.

Take a few moments to enjoy Autumn’s Fall Frolic in the woods before Winter wraps the forest in a white blanket. And no matter the season, it is always fun to be surprised by a rainbow.Autumn rainbow captured near twilight with evergreens in the foreground with a dead tree and sun topped hills in the background.

Where do you enjoy Autumn the most? Feel free to share in the comments section. These pictures were taken in Cook County, Minnesota. Here’s to enjoying Autumn and all of its color no matter where you are!Colorful hillside view of Autumn trees in the background with a curving road in the foreground.

 

Collect Rocks Day

Rocks can be a decorative item both inside and out. Rocks can represent memories made with loved ones and bring to mind special times.

Lake Superior pebbled shoreline.Did you know there is a “Collect Rocks” Day?

September 16 honors collecting rocks. Rocks, stones or pebbles can be relatively easy to collect if you chose small ones. You’ll have a bit more of a challenge as you select larger ones.

Agave plant in large flower pot with a pinwheel and two rocks.Remember when Pet Rocks were popular? There is just something about rocks. They come in all sizes, shapes, colors, and textures. You can sometimes find heart shaped rocks or even state shaped ones. Your imagination can run a bit here.

Rocks can be a decorative item both inside and out. Rocks displayed in pretty candy dish on window ledge.Displaying your vacation souvenir rocks in a pretty jar or candy dish can brighten a spot in your home. Rocks are a great flower bed border or a garden accent piece. Rock lined garden bed.Whimsical painted rocks, a mobile of rocks, or stacked rocks can be strategically placed to please the eye. Enjoy your favorite rock as a paper weight.

Rocks can be made into a variety of “pretties” whether as a pendant, stone beads in a bracelet, or as earrings. Donut shaped stones can easily be turned into pendants with a bit of cord and a clasp.

Rock strewn creek with evergreen trees in background.Who doesn’t like to throw rocks into a lake or river? Skipping rocks can be a fun pastime or competition. Children enjoy playing in pebbles where they can build mounds, valleys, and run their toys around their creations. View of Lake Superior with a bit of beach in foreground and a lone evergreen on the rock left side.Watching water flow over rocks can be beautiful and mesmerizing.

Rocks can represent memories made with loved ones and bring to mind special times. Father Baraga monument with rocks placed as a memorial.Stones are used as both formal and informal memorials. They provide both function and beauty.

Garden Guard Gnome by large rock in mulched bed.So, to celebrate Collect Rocks Day, do something with those special rocks you collected that are sitting in a coffee can or bucket. And remember — “You Rock!”“You Rock” spelled out in rocks on sand and pebble Lake Superior beach.

P.S. Be respectful of rules at your local, state and national parks.Rock border of mulched garden bed.

Ways You Can Enjoy History

. . . learning a skill puts a new perspective on history and you might find the key to enjoying history too.

Great Hall porch looking through the doors of the Great Hall toward the Kitchen doorIn a previous post, I shared how historical reenactments can be enjoyed by the whole family.

Would it surprise you to know that I hated learning about history growing up? It definitely would surprise my reenactor friends to know that at an earlier time in my life I couldn’t understand why people would dress up in those “funny clothes” and sweat all day while pretending to live in an earlier time period. Well, I actually ended up doing just that and loved it!

As I look back over my family’s reenacting years, I realize that we usually learned 1-2 new skills a year. Learning a new historical skill is something anyone can do whether or not you think you’ll ever reenact history. Also, learning a skill puts a new perspective on history and you might find the key to enjoying history too.Equipment used for power generation

Here are some ideas or areas you could choose to explore if you want to learn a new skill or try to enjoy a part of history.

Calligraphy
Paper making
Basics of traditional book binding
Embroidery
Knitting
Wood carving
Splitting wood
Fire starting
Campfire cooking
Bread making from scratch
Sourdough bread making
Making butter
Wine making
Fashions of specific historical periods
Artworks of specific historical periods
Beadwork
Basket making
Pine needle basket making
Knot tying
Courting/Marrying/Burying customs
Child rearing practices
Herbs and their historical uses (Thieves essential oil blend)
Candle making (beeswax, tallow)
Pottery
Leather goods
Folklore remedies and medicinals
Accoutrements of defense and war
Toys

From the above list, you might get the idea we are preppers or survivalists, but we just have a love of history.

Autobiographies can be an intriguing way to learn about history as well as a specific person. Historical terms can be fun. Do you know the origin of SHIT? The phrase, “It’s cold enough to freeze the balls off a brass monkey” can be an interesting conversation starter. Do you know what it means?

Brick arched, recessed window well inside museumThere are so many fun, interesting things to learn about related to our history. I encourage you to get a book or video from your library on a topic of interest. You could also “Google” or use YouTube to learn about your area of interest. I’d love to hear what historical interests you have. Feel free to share in the comments section.

“Herd Thinning” Venture

What do you do with your surplus of stuff as you . . . downsize your possessions?

Display of antiques and other merchandise on a table with a four shelf fixture on it.With our 35 years of marriage, my husband and I have accumulated lots of stuff, trinkets, treasures, antiques, interesting items, and a little bit of junque.

Note, junque is classier than junk.

Not to mention the extra goodies we acquired after 3 of 4 parents have passed. We both love books, pottery, historic memorabilia, and the unusual. What do you do with your surplus of stuff as you “thin your herd” and downsize your possessions?

You could open your own store, have lots of garage sales, donate, and/or do nothing and let your family deal with it when you are gone. My parents chose the last option and I really don’t want to do that to our son, but my husband does.

My solution—set up a booth in an antique store! In our property search to relocate to Texas, we enjoyed the small town of Navasota in Grimes County. Navasota has a quaint downtown and lots of small shops. One shop we enjoyed was the Navasota Emporium and it came to mind as a good fit for our new venture.

And we’re off and running with our herd thinning. Stayed tuned for further updates.

Coming soon — a blog page for Fort Couch Quartermaster LLC.

Historical Reenactments are Fun for the Whole Family

You’ll miss out if you don’t talk to the reenactors. Ask questions or strike up a conversation. Inquire about what’s for supper. The majority of reenactors will gladly converse with you.

Front of the Great Hall at Grand Portage National Monument with Mt. Rose in the background.Are you looking for a fun event or activity your whole family can enjoy?

And do you really, really want your children to hopefully learn something in the process? Give a historical re-enactment a try!

If you walked into a Midwest Rendezvous encampment, you would see a lot of white canvas tents in a variety of shapes and sizes as well as some tipis with lodge poles extending toward the sky. People of all ages would be dressed in long sleeves unless their morals aren’t up with societal expectations. Meat roasting over an open campfire, children hauling wood and water to their camp as well as running and playing would be other sights. Women might be putting together a pie for supper or sitting and sewing while they visit with one another. Vendors would be selling a variety of trade goods, sewing notions, beads, hats, clothing and toys. Items from the “period.” You may also see a variety of friendly competitions of knife throwing, shooting, and tomahawk throwing.Reenactor making pies in the kitchen.

All across America, all sorts of history is being relived by historical reenactors. Revolutionary War, French & Indian War, Civil War, Fur Trade Era, Renaissance, Mountain Man and Rendezvous. There are many more historical venues than those mentioned here. Check your local county historical society and historical parks for possible opportunities. Also, look at a state’s tourism guide for events.

White canvas tents in green field with evergreens and blue sky in background.You can attend an event and soak it all in as you walk through and check out displays and watch scheduled performances. However, you’ll miss out if you don’t talk to the reenactors. Ask questions or strike up a conversation about politics of the era. Inquire about what’s for supper or what is cooking over the campfire. Observe how their daily life is different from yours and ask polite questions. It is important to use your manners when conversing and also to respect their property and accoutrements. Do not enter tents uninvited or touch items  without permission. The majority of reenactors will gladly converse with you, and share about their belongings and daily life.Campfire with fish being smoked over it, birch bark lodge, and birch bark basket.

Beware—attending a historical event can be contagious! You just might get the “wild hair” to start reenacting. There are so many facets to reenacting. Clothing, shoes, toys, foods, cooking methods, music, dance, crafts, tentage, military uniforms, language, religion, eating utensils, and phrases just to name a few. With all these facets there is bound to be something everyone in the family can enjoy. Oh, this is in addition to the period foods that are great to try. There are usually vendors selling interesting foods of the time period.Wild ricing display

Find an event, go and enjoy, and then plan to springboard more learning from something you or your children really liked. Intrigued by the Dutch oven or campfire cooking? Want to know more about a specific general and their battle strategy? Wonder what life as an endentured servant was like? Hit your library or the internet and learn more. Oh, and don’t forget to mark your calendar for next year’s event! Your gonna wanna be there.

P.S. Check out the post about Rendezvous Days in Grand Portage, MN the second full weekend in August. This is a fabulous event!

Backwoods Find Repurposed

Serving as a showpiece in my garden and a planter for Hens & Chicks gives the crock a beautiful, new purpose!

Broken crock hidden in the woods.

You never know what you will find on a walk in the woods.

In addition to nature, beauty, and critters you just might find something to repurpose.

Walking in the woods can bring lots of surprises and enjoyment. Catching a glimpse of a squirrel scurrying about. Tripping across a snake skin shed. Watching a turtle slowly moving through leaves and underbrush or even finding an empty turtle shell.Empty turtle shell on grass with brown leaves around in spots. Seeing a heron take flight or an eagle fly overhead. Watching ants going in and out of their hill going about their business. Seeing a water ripple from a fish breaking the surface of a pond. Red or blue wings as birds fly from tree to tree. Colorful flowers in bud or bloom are always a treat.Purple flowering tree branch with woods in background.

Sometimes, you trip across unexpected items in the woods like a deflated balloon tossed about by the wind. Blown garbage is not uncommon. Broken crock discarded in woods.Finding a large, cracked and abandoned butter churn crock in our woods was an unexpected surprise and a welcomed find. Standing broken butter churn crock found in woods.I knew that I would repurpose it with a spot in my garden.

So now this once useful crock that was broken and discarded is once again earning its keep. Serving as a showpiece in my garden and a planter for Hens & Chicks gives the crock a beautiful, new purpose!Broken butter churn crock found in woods and repurposed in mulched garden with Hens & Chicks placed in several spots.

Whether you have a backwoods find, a thrift store bargain, or the garage sale deal of the day, get busy thinking on how you can put it to good use in your yard or garden. Repurposing  or upcycling can be a creative outlet that brings satisfaction. What ideas or items do you have for repurposing? Do you have favorite items you’re on the lookout for?Purple flowers with their greenery in wooded setting.

Managing When Your AC is Being Repaired

Do your active work around the house and yard in early morning and early evening when it is cooler. Schedule any errands or appointments during the heat of the day so you can soak up some AC! Keep that positive attitude, hydrate, and take steps to keep you and your home as cool as possible.

Outside thermometer showing almost 100 degrees.It can happen to any of us. The air conditioner starts acting wonky, stops spitting out cold air,

and is just uncooperative with any tweaks you try. Of course, it is prime time for AC repair when this happens. What to do? Kick in those common sense skills and line up a repairman!

It’s almost 100 degrees in the shade and 87 degrees in the house. It could be worse — it could be July or August in Texas instead of only June. First recommendation is to keep a positive attitude. Think of all the good points to this life experience. Our ancestors got by without air conditioning. If you’re my age or older, most of your public school years were without it. You can get through a small number of days while the repair takes place.Inside thermometer showing 87 degrees.

Here are  common sense ideas to keep in mind:

Monitor the outside and inside temperatures. Open windows when cooler outside than inside. Close windows before it gets hotter inside than outside. Closing drapes or blinds to keep the sun out can help keep it cooler inside too.

Use your ceiling fans as well as smaller fans. A slight movement of blowing air can be refreshing. We put a small fan by a window screen with the fan blowing inward to try and draw cooler air inside during the evening and night times. On a side note, when I was growing up my friend’s family used a whole house attic fan that blew air outside the house which caused the coldest drafts to blow in the windows. Now would be the time to use an attic fan if you have one.

Wash dishes and shower with the coolest water temperature you can to minimize heat and humidity from using hot/warm water. Avoid running the dishwasher to keep out the heat and humidity output from this appliance. Hang wet bath towels outside to dry to also minimize humidity.

Do your active work around the house and yard in early morning and early evening when it is cooler. Work in the shade when you can and wear a hat to protect your head from the sun. Also, you can choose to work at a slower rate to pace yourself with the heat. Schedule any errands or appointments during the heat of the day so you can soak up some AC! You can always hang out at the library for awhile and grab a drink at your favorite fast food joint.

Hydrate often and well. Drink plenty of cool and cold drinks. Water is your friend.

Steak and hamburgers being smoked on a grill with a bit of smoke rising.Minimize adding heat to your home with cooking. Eat cold or easy to cook meals. Do not run your oven to bake anything! Cold cereal for supper is a treat in our home. Flatbread roll up sandwiches are an easy fix. Scrambled eggs don’t take long to make and are great for any meal. Buying a big tub of ice cream can be a fun daily treat while waiting on the AC fix. We bought vanilla for our dog and he loved it! Also, this could be an opportunity to grill outside on your porch.

Remember, it could always be worse. Keep that positive attitude, hydrate, and take steps to keep you and your home as cool as possible.

Wonderful Waterfalls

Whether you check out these waterfalls in person or online, they are worth your time. When the falls are running briskly, it is interesting to check out how far the output flows into Lake Superior.

Cross River falls at Schroeder, MN with water roaringDo you love waterfalls?

The sound, smell, and beauty engage our senses and can revive our spirit. Waterfalls are refreshing!

The North Shore of Minnesota offers many waterfall choices from roadside rock face drips to full roar waterfalls.

It is fun to drive along and catch a glimpse of either a trickle waterfall or full fledge roar. You’ll find both extremes as well as beautiful waterfalls meandering down creek banks toward Lake Superior.

If you plan to drive along Highway 61 up the North Shore from Duluth, be sure to do your homework and check out the waterfall possibilities on your route. If you only have time for glimpses, that’s ok. However, if you have time for a short hike or a longer one, you can catch some real beauties.

Gooseberry Falls offers several levels of falls and pavement down to the falls proper. Roaring Gooseberry Falls with evergreen trees and sky in background.We’ve visited with water roaring and water trickling in spots. Both times were fun and intriguing.Gooseberry Falls waterfall from a distance with flowing water in foreground. Evergreens and rock in background. Part of the interest with these waterfalls is seeing the rock formation and where the water flows. When there is less water, you get to see more rock.

Beaver Bay offers falls to be viewed. Beaver Bay, MN waterfall with hill and trees in background.The trail to get close to these falls is a short non-handicapped accessible trail. The town offers a rest stop right by the falls and there is an upper street level view that is worth checking out.

 

 

Further up the shore in Cook County is Temperance Falls. There is a paved walk to a landing area to view the river and part of the falls. Advancing past this point is well worth it but much more rugged and uneven hiking. Temperance Falls waterfall with high rock walls and evergreens and sky in background.There is quite a bit of rock formation on the ground around parts of these falls. Bring your camera as there are lots of photo ops!Standing on Top an Old Falls sign at Temperance Falls.

 

 

 

 

Direction sign for Cascade FallsCascade Falls is a great place to stretch your legs and seeing some beauty. Roaring Cascade River waterfall with rainbow at bottom of falls. Evergreens are on both sides and in the background.

 

 

 

 

 

 

When the falls are running briskly, it is interesting to check out how far the output flows into Lake Superior.Evidence of how far Cascade Falls flows into Lake Superior.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The East side of Grand Marais offers some smaller Waterfall East of Grand Marais, MNbut just as entertaining waterfalls to be seen from the road or enjoyed briefly with a quick walk. Judge Magney State Park  and Grand Portage have waterfalls too.

There is just something about catching a glimpse of a waterfall or being able to walk along a trail and hear the falls as you get closer. Whether you check out these waterfalls in person or online, they are worth your time. I hope you enjoy these pictures as much as I enjoyed taking them to share with you!

Hillside waterfall East of Grand Marais, MNHillside waterfall East of Grand Marais, MN

Necessity is the Mother of Invention for this Hillbilly Fix

He would normally use bungee cords or rope but didn’t have what was needed on hand. He thought of another solution using items he had on hand — wood and long screws.

Two arms putting a screw into wood with a battery powered drill. The wood is being held in place on top of a truck rack.Necessity is the Mother of Invention — wouldn’t you agree?

 

Have you ever planned to do something a certain way and not had the materials or resources you thought you had? What did you do?

When such situations occur, we start to brainstorm a solution. What else could be used? Is there another way to accomplish the task or goal? Do I really have to go to the hardware store one more time? What do I have that I can use to solve this need?

This could apply to cooking. You might be making a recipe that calls for buttermilk and there isn’t any in the fridge. So, you use lemon juice or vinegar in milk to make your buttermilk. Another possibility is to try the recipe with a similar ingredient like almond milk, regular milk, or condensed milk.

I had the knob fall off the backdoor once. I dug up a fix it book, gleaned what I could apply to my situation, and kept at it until I fixed the doorknob. My husband wasn’t home and I wasn’t willing to pay a locksmith unless I absolutely had to. So, I kept at it until I fixed it. I’m not sharing the whole, detailed story as I had to figure out getting into and out of the backyard over the wooden 5 foot fence too. That fix it job was an ordeal, but I got it done!

A man putting a screw into wood with a battery powered drill. The wood is being held in place on top of a truck rack.Recently, my husband Pete was loading some wood for transport on top of the truck. He would normally use bungee cords or rope but didn’t have what was needed on hand. He thought of another solution using items he had on hand — wood and long screws. The wood underneath was pulled up into the wood above it with screws so the tension would hold all the boards in place. His solution worked just fine to transport the wood from Minnesota to Illinois. We chuckled at his “hillbilly” fix, but it did the job.A man putting a screw into wood with a battery powered drill. The wood is being held in place on top of a truck rack.

According to Wikipedia, “Necessity is the mother of invention,” is an English language proverb. When faced with a problem or challenge that has to be addressed, doesn’t it force you to find a solution? What have you invented out of necessity?Wood being held in place on top of a truck rack by screws.

Pileated Woodpecker Versus Balsam Fir

When we checked out the tree in April after the snow was melted, we discovered that Chisel wasn’t done with the fir in January.

Ten woodpecker holes in base and on above ground roots of balsam fir tree.

Who knew that a woodpecker would peck this much wood?

It is always fun to hear a woodpecker in the woods and try to locate him. Most often, this is not an easy task. This winter Pete spotted a Pileated Woodpecker, let’s call him “Chisel.” He was first discovered because the wood chips were flying and the red comb on his head was bobbing up and down furiously. Check out my original post to get in on the beginning of Chisel’s story — Opportunistic Animals’ Winter Eating. There is even a video of him with the wood chips going every which way.

Ten woodpecker holes in base of balsam fir trunk and above ground roots. Also, lots of wood chips on the ground.We were surprised to see Chisel had put holes in the above ground root of a balsam fir in our yard. This occurred in January and we resigned ourselves that we would probably lose this tree. That’s ok though.

When we checked out the tree in April after the snow was melted, we discovered that Chisel wasn’t done with the fir in January. He continued to look for food and it appears he even made a nice size nesting hole. Woodpecker hole in trunk that is large enough to nest in.We don’t know if he used it or if some other creature used the shelter. Also, there was even more wood shrapnel at the base of the balsam. I hope he found lots of food for all that work!

Close up of two woodpecker holes in above ground root of fir tree.Toward the end of April, Chisel was spotted in the yard on the opposite side of the house. This time he was hunting higher up in the trees but looked pretty healthy. I sure hope so after all his feeding. We’ll keep an eye out for him and see if we can spot him or his hunting evidence. We certainly wish Chisel happy hunting and hope he will frequent our yard and pick on a few of the already dead trees.

A downed fir tree riddled with woodpecker holes.

In a different neck of the wood, we found this downed fir tree riddled with woodpecker holes. The tree is horizontal to the ground and offers easy pickin’s as evidenced by the many holes.Close up of downed fir tree riddled with woodpecker holes.

Looks like Chisel’s cousins had happy hunting on this tree.

Next time your walking in the woods, keep your ears open for that rat-a-tat-tat sound of beak on wood.

Spring Tease Time

Spring will be melting away the remnants of icy beauty and replacing it with the sun sparkled waves of her season.

Beach scene of Lake Superior with trees in far distance. Sun is sparkling off water. There is are ice crust layers between the water and beach.Spring Tease: the time of year when Winter and Spring are in a tug of war. Beach scene of Lake Superior with trees in far distance. Sun is sparkling off water.

Winter isn’t quite ready to give up but knows its time to step back for a bit. Spring is more than ready to display her charms but seems slow to give Winter that final pull to win the match.

Patches of snow are melting quickly on the North Shore of Minnesota. During this seasonal changeover, Lake Superior continues to offer breathtaking beauty and a changing beach decor.Wicked waves with flat beach and bigger rocks on beach from Lake Superior.

Wicked waves with beautiful white edges create a flatter beach but provide bigger rocks for the choosing. Wicked waves with flat beach on Lake Superior. Icy layer then sand then water.

 

It is amazing to see the beach with fine sand and swept clean one time and then stair stepped pebbled another time.Cobblestone beach then ice layers then Lake Superior, left to right.

 

 

 

 

Section of Lake Superior pebble beach with dry rocks, then wet rocks with open water and then icy layers.

Spring will be melting away the remnants of icy beauty and replacing it with the sun sparkled waves of her season. Hopefully sooner rather than later! Aren’t we all rooting for her to make that final pull to win this tug of war?Lake Superior beach with wicked waves, bigger rocks washed ashore and small icicles hanging from bare tree branches.

Spidered ice patch on Lake Superior pebble beach.