Historical Reenactments are Fun for the Whole Family

You’ll miss out if you don’t talk to the reenactors. Ask questions or strike up a conversation. Inquire about what’s for supper. The majority of reenactors will gladly converse with you.

Front of the Great Hall at Grand Portage National Monument with Mt. Rose in the background.Are you looking for a fun event or activity your whole family can enjoy?

And do you really, really want your children to hopefully learn something in the process? Give a historical re-enactment a try!

If you walked into a Midwest Rendezvous encampment, you would see a lot of white canvas tents in a variety of shapes and sizes as well as some tipis with lodge poles extending toward the sky. People of all ages would be dressed in long sleeves unless their morals aren’t up with societal expectations. Meat roasting over an open campfire, children hauling wood and water to their camp as well as running and playing would be other sights. Women might be putting together a pie for supper or sitting and sewing while they visit with one another. Vendors would be selling a variety of trade goods, sewing notions, beads, hats, clothing and toys. Items from the “period.” You may also see a variety of friendly competitions of knife throwing, shooting, and tomahawk throwing.Reenactor making pies in the kitchen.

All across America, all sorts of history is being relived by historical reenactors. Revolutionary War, French & Indian War, Civil War, Fur Trade Era, Renaissance, Mountain Man and Rendezvous. There are many more historical venues than those mentioned here. Check your local county historical society and historical parks for possible opportunities. Also, look at a state’s tourism guide for events.

White canvas tents in green field with evergreens and blue sky in background.You can attend an event and soak it all in as you walk through and check out displays and watch scheduled performances. However, you’ll miss out if you don’t talk to the reenactors. Ask questions or strike up a conversation about politics of the era. Inquire about what’s for supper or what is cooking over the campfire. Observe how their daily life is different from yours and ask polite questions. It is important to use your manners when conversing and also to respect their property and accoutrements. Do not enter tents uninvited or touch items  without permission. The majority of reenactors will gladly converse with you, and share about their belongings and daily life.Campfire with fish being smoked over it, birch bark lodge, and birch bark basket.

Beware—attending a historical event can be contagious! You just might get the “wild hair” to start reenacting. There are so many facets to reenacting. Clothing, shoes, toys, foods, cooking methods, music, dance, crafts, tentage, military uniforms, language, religion, eating utensils, and phrases just to name a few. With all these facets there is bound to be something everyone in the family can enjoy. Oh, this is in addition to the period foods that are great to try. There are usually vendors selling interesting foods of the time period.Wild ricing display

Find an event, go and enjoy, and then plan to springboard more learning from something you or your children really liked. Intrigued by the Dutch oven or campfire cooking? Want to know more about a specific general and their battle strategy? Wonder what life as an endentured servant was like? Hit your library or the internet and learn more. Oh, and don’t forget to mark your calendar for next year’s event! Your gonna wanna be there.

P.S. Check out the post about Rendezvous Days in Grand Portage, MN the second full weekend in August. This is a fabulous event!

Backwoods Find Repurposed

Serving as a showpiece in my garden and a planter for Hens & Chicks gives the crock a beautiful, new purpose!

Broken crock hidden in the woods.

You never know what you will find on a walk in the woods.

In addition to nature, beauty, and critters you just might find something to repurpose.

Walking in the woods can bring lots of surprises and enjoyment. Catching a glimpse of a squirrel scurrying about. Tripping across a snake skin shed. Watching a turtle slowly moving through leaves and underbrush or even finding an empty turtle shell.Empty turtle shell on grass with brown leaves around in spots. Seeing a heron take flight or an eagle fly overhead. Watching ants going in and out of their hill going about their business. Seeing a water ripple from a fish breaking the surface of a pond. Red or blue wings as birds fly from tree to tree. Colorful flowers in bud or bloom are always a treat.Purple flowering tree branch with woods in background.

Sometimes, you trip across unexpected items in the woods like a deflated balloon tossed about by the wind. Blown garbage is not uncommon. Broken crock discarded in woods.Finding a large, cracked and abandoned butter churn crock in our woods was an unexpected surprise and a welcomed find. Standing broken butter churn crock found in woods.I knew that I would repurpose it with a spot in my garden.

So now this once useful crock that was broken and discarded is once again earning its keep. Serving as a showpiece in my garden and a planter for Hens & Chicks gives the crock a beautiful, new purpose!Broken butter churn crock found in woods and repurposed in mulched garden with Hens & Chicks placed in several spots.

Whether you have a backwoods find, a thrift store bargain, or the garage sale deal of the day, get busy thinking on how you can put it to good use in your yard or garden. Repurposing  or upcycling can be a creative outlet that brings satisfaction. What ideas or items do you have for repurposing? Do you have favorite items you’re on the lookout for?Purple flowers with their greenery in wooded setting.

Managing When Your AC is Being Repaired

Do your active work around the house and yard in early morning and early evening when it is cooler. Schedule any errands or appointments during the heat of the day so you can soak up some AC! Keep that positive attitude, hydrate, and take steps to keep you and your home as cool as possible.

Outside thermometer showing almost 100 degrees.It can happen to any of us. The air conditioner starts acting wonky, stops spitting out cold air,

and is just uncooperative with any tweaks you try. Of course, it is prime time for AC repair when this happens. What to do? Kick in those common sense skills and line up a repairman!

It’s almost 100 degrees in the shade and 87 degrees in the house. It could be worse — it could be July or August in Texas instead of only June. First recommendation is to keep a positive attitude. Think of all the good points to this life experience. Our ancestors got by without air conditioning. If you’re my age or older, most of your public school years were without it. You can get through a small number of days while the repair takes place.Inside thermometer showing 87 degrees.

Here are  common sense ideas to keep in mind:

Monitor the outside and inside temperatures. Open windows when cooler outside than inside. Close windows before it gets hotter inside than outside. Closing drapes or blinds to keep the sun out can help keep it cooler inside too.

Use your ceiling fans as well as smaller fans. A slight movement of blowing air can be refreshing. We put a small fan by a window screen with the fan blowing inward to try and draw cooler air inside during the evening and night times. On a side note, when I was growing up my friend’s family used a whole house attic fan that blew air outside the house which caused the coldest drafts to blow in the windows. Now would be the time to use an attic fan if you have one.

Wash dishes and shower with the coolest water temperature you can to minimize heat and humidity from using hot/warm water. Avoid running the dishwasher to keep out the heat and humidity output from this appliance. Hang wet bath towels outside to dry to also minimize humidity.

Do your active work around the house and yard in early morning and early evening when it is cooler. Work in the shade when you can and wear a hat to protect your head from the sun. Also, you can choose to work at a slower rate to pace yourself with the heat. Schedule any errands or appointments during the heat of the day so you can soak up some AC! You can always hang out at the library for awhile and grab a drink at your favorite fast food joint.

Hydrate often and well. Drink plenty of cool and cold drinks. Water is your friend.

Steak and hamburgers being smoked on a grill with a bit of smoke rising.Minimize adding heat to your home with cooking. Eat cold or easy to cook meals. Do not run your oven to bake anything! Cold cereal for supper is a treat in our home. Flatbread roll up sandwiches are an easy fix. Scrambled eggs don’t take long to make and are great for any meal. Buying a big tub of ice cream can be a fun daily treat while waiting on the AC fix. We bought vanilla for our dog and he loved it! Also, this could be an opportunity to grill outside on your porch.

Remember, it could always be worse. Keep that positive attitude, hydrate, and take steps to keep you and your home as cool as possible.

Wonderful Waterfalls

Whether you check out these waterfalls in person or online, they are worth your time. When the falls are running briskly, it is interesting to check out how far the output flows into Lake Superior.

Cross River falls at Schroeder, MN with water roaringDo you love waterfalls?

The sound, smell, and beauty engage our senses and can revive our spirit. Waterfalls are refreshing!

The North Shore of Minnesota offers many waterfall choices from roadside rock face drips to full roar waterfalls.

It is fun to drive along and catch a glimpse of either a trickle waterfall or full fledge roar. You’ll find both extremes as well as beautiful waterfalls meandering down creek banks toward Lake Superior.

If you plan to drive along Highway 61 up the North Shore from Duluth, be sure to do your homework and check out the waterfall possibilities on your route. If you only have time for glimpses, that’s ok. However, if you have time for a short hike or a longer one, you can catch some real beauties.

Gooseberry Falls offers several levels of falls and pavement down to the falls proper. Roaring Gooseberry Falls with evergreen trees and sky in background.We’ve visited with water roaring and water trickling in spots. Both times were fun and intriguing.Gooseberry Falls waterfall from a distance with flowing water in foreground. Evergreens and rock in background. Part of the interest with these waterfalls is seeing the rock formation and where the water flows. When there is less water, you get to see more rock.

Beaver Bay offers falls to be viewed. Beaver Bay, MN waterfall with hill and trees in background.The trail to get close to these falls is a short non-handicapped accessible trail. The town offers a rest stop right by the falls and there is an upper street level view that is worth checking out.

 

 

Further up the shore in Cook County is Temperance Falls. There is a paved walk to a landing area to view the river and part of the falls. Advancing past this point is well worth it but much more rugged and uneven hiking. Temperance Falls waterfall with high rock walls and evergreens and sky in background.There is quite a bit of rock formation on the ground around parts of these falls. Bring your camera as there are lots of photo ops!Standing on Top an Old Falls sign at Temperance Falls.

 

 

 

 

Direction sign for Cascade FallsCascade Falls is a great place to stretch your legs and seeing some beauty. Roaring Cascade River waterfall with rainbow at bottom of falls. Evergreens are on both sides and in the background.

 

 

 

 

 

 

When the falls are running briskly, it is interesting to check out how far the output flows into Lake Superior.Evidence of how far Cascade Falls flows into Lake Superior.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The East side of Grand Marais offers some smaller Waterfall East of Grand Marais, MNbut just as entertaining waterfalls to be seen from the road or enjoyed briefly with a quick walk. Judge Magney State Park  and Grand Portage have waterfalls too.

There is just something about catching a glimpse of a waterfall or being able to walk along a trail and hear the falls as you get closer. Whether you check out these waterfalls in person or online, they are worth your time. I hope you enjoy these pictures as much as I enjoyed taking them to share with you!

Hillside waterfall East of Grand Marais, MNHillside waterfall East of Grand Marais, MN

Necessity is the Mother of Invention for this Hillbilly Fix

He would normally use bungee cords or rope but didn’t have what was needed on hand. He thought of another solution using items he had on hand — wood and long screws.

Two arms putting a screw into wood with a battery powered drill. The wood is being held in place on top of a truck rack.Necessity is the Mother of Invention — wouldn’t you agree?

 

Have you ever planned to do something a certain way and not had the materials or resources you thought you had? What did you do?

When such situations occur, we start to brainstorm a solution. What else could be used? Is there another way to accomplish the task or goal? Do I really have to go to the hardware store one more time? What do I have that I can use to solve this need?

This could apply to cooking. You might be making a recipe that calls for buttermilk and there isn’t any in the fridge. So, you use lemon juice or vinegar in milk to make your buttermilk. Another possibility is to try the recipe with a similar ingredient like almond milk, regular milk, or condensed milk.

I had the knob fall off the backdoor once. I dug up a fix it book, gleaned what I could apply to my situation, and kept at it until I fixed the doorknob. My husband wasn’t home and I wasn’t willing to pay a locksmith unless I absolutely had to. So, I kept at it until I fixed it. I’m not sharing the whole, detailed story as I had to figure out getting into and out of the backyard over the wooden 5 foot fence too. That fix it job was an ordeal, but I got it done!

A man putting a screw into wood with a battery powered drill. The wood is being held in place on top of a truck rack.Recently, my husband Pete was loading some wood for transport on top of the truck. He would normally use bungee cords or rope but didn’t have what was needed on hand. He thought of another solution using items he had on hand — wood and long screws. The wood underneath was pulled up into the wood above it with screws so the tension would hold all the boards in place. His solution worked just fine to transport the wood from Minnesota to Illinois. We chuckled at his “hillbilly” fix, but it did the job.A man putting a screw into wood with a battery powered drill. The wood is being held in place on top of a truck rack.

According to Wikipedia, “Necessity is the mother of invention,” is an English language proverb. When faced with a problem or challenge that has to be addressed, doesn’t it force you to find a solution? What have you invented out of necessity?Wood being held in place on top of a truck rack by screws.

Pileated Woodpecker Versus Balsam Fir

When we checked out the tree in April after the snow was melted, we discovered that Chisel wasn’t done with the fir in January.

Ten woodpecker holes in base and on above ground roots of balsam fir tree.

Who knew that a woodpecker would peck this much wood?

It is always fun to hear a woodpecker in the woods and try to locate him. Most often, this is not an easy task. This winter Pete spotted a Pileated Woodpecker, let’s call him “Chisel.” He was first discovered because the wood chips were flying and the red comb on his head was bobbing up and down furiously. Check out my original post to get in on the beginning of Chisel’s story — Opportunistic Animals’ Winter Eating. There is even a video of him with the wood chips going every which way.

Ten woodpecker holes in base of balsam fir trunk and above ground roots. Also, lots of wood chips on the ground.We were surprised to see Chisel had put holes in the above ground root of a balsam fir in our yard. This occurred in January and we resigned ourselves that we would probably lose this tree. That’s ok though.

When we checked out the tree in April after the snow was melted, we discovered that Chisel wasn’t done with the fir in January. He continued to look for food and it appears he even made a nice size nesting hole. Woodpecker hole in trunk that is large enough to nest in.We don’t know if he used it or if some other creature used the shelter. Also, there was even more wood shrapnel at the base of the balsam. I hope he found lots of food for all that work!

Close up of two woodpecker holes in above ground root of fir tree.Toward the end of April, Chisel was spotted in the yard on the opposite side of the house. This time he was hunting higher up in the trees but looked pretty healthy. I sure hope so after all his feeding. We’ll keep an eye out for him and see if we can spot him or his hunting evidence. We certainly wish Chisel happy hunting and hope he will frequent our yard and pick on a few of the already dead trees.

A downed fir tree riddled with woodpecker holes.

In a different neck of the wood, we found this downed fir tree riddled with woodpecker holes. The tree is horizontal to the ground and offers easy pickin’s as evidenced by the many holes.Close up of downed fir tree riddled with woodpecker holes.

Looks like Chisel’s cousins had happy hunting on this tree.

Next time your walking in the woods, keep your ears open for that rat-a-tat-tat sound of beak on wood.

Spring Tease Time

Spring will be melting away the remnants of icy beauty and replacing it with the sun sparkled waves of her season.

Beach scene of Lake Superior with trees in far distance. Sun is sparkling off water. There is are ice crust layers between the water and beach.Spring Tease: the time of year when Winter and Spring are in a tug of war. Beach scene of Lake Superior with trees in far distance. Sun is sparkling off water.

Winter isn’t quite ready to give up but knows its time to step back for a bit. Spring is more than ready to display her charms but seems slow to give Winter that final pull to win the match.

Patches of snow are melting quickly on the North Shore of Minnesota. During this seasonal changeover, Lake Superior continues to offer breathtaking beauty and a changing beach decor.Wicked waves with flat beach and bigger rocks on beach from Lake Superior.

Wicked waves with beautiful white edges create a flatter beach but provide bigger rocks for the choosing. Wicked waves with flat beach on Lake Superior. Icy layer then sand then water.

 

It is amazing to see the beach with fine sand and swept clean one time and then stair stepped pebbled another time.Cobblestone beach then ice layers then Lake Superior, left to right.

 

 

 

 

Section of Lake Superior pebble beach with dry rocks, then wet rocks with open water and then icy layers.

Spring will be melting away the remnants of icy beauty and replacing it with the sun sparkled waves of her season. Hopefully sooner rather than later! Aren’t we all rooting for her to make that final pull to win this tug of war?Lake Superior beach with wicked waves, bigger rocks washed ashore and small icicles hanging from bare tree branches.

Spidered ice patch on Lake Superior pebble beach.

 

 

 

 

 

A Splash of Spring’s Colorful Flowers

These splashes of color provide hope and beauty that Winter is waning and Spring is going to burst forth.

Bluebonnets, the Texas State FlowerTreating you to a Splash of Spring . . .

. . . with these pictures from East Texas. These flowers presented themselves in March and/or April.

No matter where you live, I think everyone reaches that point in late Winter when they are ready for the next season — Spring. These splashes of color provide hope and beauty that Winter is waning and Spring is going to burst forth. Pink flowering tree in the woods.

Pink flowering tree in the woods.

 

 

 

Blue pottery bird bath on tree stump with yellow flowers in background.

 

 

From shades of pink and purple . . .

Purple flower in sand with minimal foliage

 

 

 

 

. . . with golden cat, aka Frank, strolling around, and yellow and white flowers too.

Gold cat with pink flowers with green foliage.

 

Bluebonnets abound as you drive along highways and backroads alike. Bluebonnets along country road with large tree in background.

 

 

Bluebonnets flowers up close

 

The Texas state flower, bluebonnets, are pretty at a distance and close up.

Dainty purple flower

 

 

Dainty purple and white flower.

 

 

It is a nice surprise to find patches of color in the yard or woods.

Clump of purple flowers.

 

 

 

Dainty pink flowers and green clover like foliage.

 

 

 

Dainty pink flowers and green clover like foliage. Agave plant in terra cotta pot in background.

While not a flower, you’ll see my agave plant in the flower pot behind this beautiful clump of dainty pink flowers and green, clover like foliage.

Hens and Chicks "hen" in sand with rock and glass electric insulator in garden bed.

 

 

 

Hens and Chicks are a succulent that are easy to grow and beautiful in their own right adding shades of color to the garden.Hens and Chicks "hen" in sand with rock and glass electric insulator in garden bed.Dainty yellow blooms with lots of green foliage.

 

 

 

Dainty flower probably in daffodil family. Two large rocks behind and log background.

 

 

 

White Iris blooms with succulent in flower pot behind.

White Iris with block pillar in background.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wishing you a joyful Spring Season with lots of colorful moments and flowers in your life!

Field of bluebonnet flowers with trees in background.

Grand Portage 2 in 1 Northshore Minnesota Vacation

Rendezvous Days is one of our favorite events. Between Pow Wow and the Encampment there is plenty to do, see, and enjoy. Do be sure to wear comfortable shoes, check the weather, and come prepared for lots of fun.

Looking for a picturesque, relaxing, and educational vacation rolled into one where you set the pace? Front of the Great Hall at Grand Portage National Monument with Mt. Rose in the background.Sound too good to be true? Check out Rendezvous Days in Grand Portage, Minnesota.

Rendezvous Days is the second full weekend in August each year. The Grand Portage Anishinabe Nation hosts the annual Rendezvous Days Pow Wow while the Grand Portage National Monument re-creates a historic fur trade era rendezvous.

Pow Wow is a celebration of culture and family. As you approach the Pow Wow grounds, you may see several tipis and lots of tents from dancers and their families gathered to celebrate. Tipis and tents at the Pow Wow grounds.Walk around the outside of the Pow Wow stands to enjoy crafts, souvenirs, and food vendors.  People walking around vendor area of Pow Wow.You will definitely want to be seated in the stands for one of the three Grand Entries. A beautiful, energy charged atmosphere is present as the dancers enter the arena wearing their regalia. Veterans are highly honored and celebrated at this Pow Wow. The opening ceremony is respectful, sobering and thought provoking. After Grand Entry is concluded, the high energy Sneak Up Dance often occurs. Dancers in the Pow Wow arena with the MC stand in the background.Be sure to stay at Pow Wow awhile and grab some fry bread and an Indian Taco. There are a variety of dances and drum songs you can enjoy. The beat of the Drum represents the heartbeat of the earth and permeates this celebration. You have to be present to fully appreciate the Drum’s impact. Two male traditional dancers with their bustles.

 

 

 

 

 

Before attending Pow Wow for your first time, I recommend you read about Pow Wow etiquette. You can find some good information online. There are ways to respectfully ask questions of dancers, and definite do’s and don’ts. Do be sure to wear comfortable shoes, check the weather, and come prepared for lots of fun.

 

Canoe in foreground with white canvas awnings in mid ground and Lake Superior in the background with evergreens and a blue sky.As you enter Rendezvous at the Grand Portage National Monument, you’ll experience yet another energy charged atmosphere. A myriad of reenactors of all ages are enjoying the re-creation of the fur trade rendezvous at an actual historic rendezvous location. In addition to the primitive camps, campfire cooking, and the hauling of water and wood, there are opportunities for demonstrations, workshops, and games you won’t want to miss. Park staff work hard to make this event a fun and educational one for the public and reenactors.White canvas tents in green field with evergreens and blue sky in background.Be sure to look at the Rendezvous Days schedule to plan what you want to do. Some of the workshops fill up quickly, so scope out the sign up rules. Some workshops are open to visitors and some are only for reenactors.

 

Long wooden table inside the Great HallWalking through the encampment and historic grounds, there is much to see and experience. The Great Hall offers a covered porch where you can sit and relax as you gaze out on Lake Superior.  Look at the events to find a time when you can also enjoy some music. Bagpipes are often heard during the encampment, and Over the Waterfall is a group of period musicians you won’t want to miss. You’ll also find displays, artifacts, and monument staff available to answer your questions. Reenactor cooking in open kitchen fireplace.

 

Cross the covered walkway from the Great Hall to the kitchen to see food being prepared.

Hat making display in Grand Hall

 

 

Campfire with fish being smoked over it, birch bark lodge, and birch bark basket.

 

Continue meandering around Grand Portage Monument to the Canoe Shed and then on to the Native Encampment.Wild ricing display

 

 

 

Three Sisters Garden with scarecrow

Be sure to see the Three Sisters Garden.  You will also want take in the Heritage Center to gain a historic perspective of the fur trade. While there, learn about Grand Portage via the park film. Both local residents and reenactors are featured in the film.

 

Rendezvous Days is one of our favorite events. Between Pow Wow and the Encampment there is plenty to do, see, and enjoy. To top all of this off, the location of these events is picturesque with Lake Superior’s presence.View of Pete's Island and Lake Superior over Grand Portage stockade fence

Great Hall porch looking through the doors of the Great Hall toward the Kitchen door

Grand Portage National Monument Sign with Great Hall and white canvas tents in background.

 

 

 

Looking out over Lake Superior from Grand Portage National Park shoreline with island and shoreline off in the distance and rocks and bushes in foreground

 

Grilled Cheese Day – April 12 – Create a Custom Build

Grilled Cheese is a comfort food, childhood menu staple, and . . . lots can be done to give this icon a “make-over.”

Grilled cheese sandwich cut in triangles on a plateRemember having grilled cheese sandwiches as a kid? Well, April 12 is Grilled Cheese Day and you can create a custom build version.

My mom always bought Sunbeam white bread. Growing up my grilled cheese sandwich was made from white bread, margarine either spread on the outside sides of the sandwich or premelted on the griddle, and Kraft American Cheese slice singles. Oh, and once it was cooked, I topped it with grape jelly—yuuuum! We also called this sandwich a “cheese toastie.” I still remember the old griddle, probably aluminum, with its stuck on discoloration from years of pancakes and cheese toasties.

Grilled Cheese is a comfort food, childhood menu staple, and is offered on many restaurant menus. Lots can be done to give this icon a “make-over.” Change up bread and cheese choices to create custom sandwiches. Rye bread and Swiss cheese, sourdough bread and vegetable Monterey Jack Cheese, and whole wheat bread and your choice of two cheeses are a few combos to get your creative ideas going. Be sure to use real butter instead of margarine and real cheese instead of processed. Another change is the add on’s you can put in or on your grilled cheese. Anyone for bacon? Add a little pizza sauce and/or pepperoni for a pizza cheese toastie. Add some sauerkraut to the rye & Swiss toastie along with some mayo. Think about your favorite sandwich and what flavors you want on your own custom build. Oooh, Texas Toast Bread would be a great building block for a grilled cheese. What ideas do you have?

Note: Photo retrieved on April 12, 2018 from: https://www.google.com/amp/s/nationaldaycalendar.com/days-2/national-grilled-cheese-sandwich-day-april-12/%3famp

Jesus was No Fool

Wishing you a thoughtful Easter . . . Easter wouldn’t be Easter without the miracle of Jesus’ resurrection — his victory over death and sin.

Easter falls on Sunday, April 1, 2018 which is also April Fool’s Day. But, make no mistake about it, Jesus was no fool.

Jesus knew who he was and what he was about. In Luke 19:10, Jesus says, “For the Son of Man came to seek and save the lost.” Jesus saved “the lost” when his ministry on earth culminated in his death on the cross, burial, and resurrection 3 days later.

Easter celebrates the amazing love and sacrifice of Jesus dying a horrendous death by crucifixion to pay the price for all the wrongful things you and I do (sin). BUT, Jesus didn’t stay dead. Easter wouldn’t be Easter without the miracle of Jesus’ resurrection — his victory over death and sin. This is why and what we celebrate.

Wishing you a thoughtful Easter as you ponder what you will do about what Jesus did for you and me. Do YOU know who Jesus was and what he was about?White Iris flowers with potted succulent in background.

Tredegar Iron Works Worth a Tourist Stop

During the Civil War, this was the largest iron works in the Confederacy.

Museum display with Confederate flag and U.S. flag.Are you a history buff, like to look at interesting stuff, and/or appreciate old buildings? Then be sure to put Tredegar Iron Works on your schedule.

Located in Richmond, Virginia near the riverfront, it has been designated a National Historic Landmark.

Historic Tredegar sign

 

 

 

 

 

 

In addition to the historic displays, you will find a little gift shop as well as a hands on children’s area are inside the iron works. Overshot water wheel for millYou will also want to walk outside on the grounds and check out the outside displays. If you’re curious about this site, you can learn more at The National Park Service (NPS) webpage on the iron works. Equipment used for power generationDuring the Civil War, this was the largest iron works in the Confederacy. “In 2006, a private nonprofit museum opened in the cannon foundry, now called The American Civil War Museum at Historic Tredegar.  “Covered in Glory, United States Colored Troops” displayThe museum tells the story of the Civil War from Union, Confederate, and African American perspectives,” according to the NPS site: https://www.nps.gov/nr/travel/richmond/tredegar.htmlAssortment of artillery projectiles

Statue of Abraham Lincoln and child sitting on bench

Brick arched, recessed window well inside museumRichmond Falls, The War Is Over poster

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read-style 3 inch shells produced at Tredegar for field artillery

Read-style three inch artillery style shell produced at Tredegar.